Christina McClendon

Librarian & info services professional: public, academic, tech.
I am a full-time internet.

Teens migrate from Facebook to a Youtube video's comment-section (funny)

kabillieu:

johnxlibris:

Cory Doctorow, boingboing.net

Here’s a funny fake-news video report­ing on the mass-migration of teens from Face­book (where their par­ents have migrat­ed) to the com­ments sec­tion of a slow-motion Youtube video of a deer run­ning. While I don’t think there’s going to be…

"Mitch Wagner, once discovered some young girls holding a gossipy chat in the comments section of an old blog post of his; when he asked them what they were doing there, they told him that their school blocked all social media, so every day they picked a random blog-post somewhere on the Internet and used it as a discussion board for the day."

Life finds a way.

The conceit [of Divergent] is that, in an unspecified future, Chicago is a walled compound wherein humans are split into factions that conform to an individual’s temperament. A more selfless person, for example, will belong to “Abnegation,” eschew vanity, and tend to the needy. The vaulting jocks and daredevils are “Dauntless” and serve as society’s protectors. “Amity” is for friendly people. The novelist, Veronica Roth, reserves her loathing for the “Erudites,” who spend their days in intellectual pursuit. She appears to be one in a long line of religious conservatives (her first acknowledgement is to God, “for your Son”) who think there’s nothing more dangerous than intellectualism, which makes people apt to seize power and impose Maoist-like uniformity on entire populations — on pain of death. I happen to share her belief that some ideologies (Maoism among them) can lead humans to commit horrific acts. But it seems to me that knowledge is our best hope against the sort of brainwashing that produces true conformity, and that Roth’s view of higher education has another agenda altogether.

David Edelstein, reviewing Divergent (2014) and totally nailing my primary issue with the book itself. (via annaverity)

Oh dear.

(via alpha-lima-lima-papa)

gothiccharmschool:

The library at Mafra National Palace in Portugal. Where, to keep books from being damaged by insects, they uses 500 bats! The bats are kept in boxes during the day but at night they are let out and eat up to double their own body weight in insects. (Info taken from this article at bookwire. Thanks to amygarvey for telling me about it!)
I think I need to go there. Do you think they’d notice if I moved in?

LIBRARY BATS.

gothiccharmschool:

The library at Mafra National Palace in Portugal. Where, to keep books from being damaged by insects, they uses 500 bats! The bats are kept in boxes during the day but at night they are let out and eat up to double their own body weight in insects. (Info taken from this article at bookwire. Thanks to amygarvey for telling me about it!)

I think I need to go there. Do you think they’d notice if I moved in?

LIBRARY BATS.

(via cleolinda)

diversityinya:

Last fall, we wrote about the diversity in the Best Fiction for Young Adults lists, which are issued annually by the Young Adult Library Services Association, a division of the American Library Association. These lists are often used for collection development and can be very helpful in boosting awareness of a book. Because the 2014 BFYA list was released last month, I thought I’d update my analysis with this year’s data.

As you can see from the charts above, the 2014 BFYA list hasn’t shown much improvement in the percentage of books about characters of color or written by authors of color.

Read the entire post and see all the charts over at DiversityinYA.com.

libraryjournal:


As spring approaches, librarians across the country begin thinking seriously about summer reading and planning outreach visits to local schools. These visits often involve a quick summary of the various services available at the local library and a preview of the prizes and events that will launch with summer reading. One of the most effective ways to encourage reading—be it over the summer months or throughout the school year—is through booktalking. A librarian, armed with a book in hand, a few well-chosen words, and a killer “hook,” is often all it takes to turn a group of staid students into a ravenous rush of readers.
We’ve asked SLJ‘s reviewers to share some of their favorite recent books, along with a short “book hook”; these are mini-booktalks intended to grab the attention of kids and teens—in as few words as possible. Their responses are curated on a fun and shareable Pinterest board.
Please add your own favorite titles and book hooks in the comments section below or post on social media using the hashtag #sljbookhook.

Another brilliant idea from our colleagues at School Library Journal. This can easily be applied for adult summer reading as well. 

libraryjournal:

As spring approaches, librarians across the country begin thinking seriously about summer reading and planning outreach visits to local schools. These visits often involve a quick summary of the various services available at the local library and a preview of the prizes and events that will launch with summer reading. One of the most effective ways to encourage reading—be it over the summer months or throughout the school year—is through booktalking. A librarian, armed with a book in hand, a few well-chosen words, and a killer “hook,” is often all it takes to turn a group of staid students into a ravenous rush of readers.

We’ve asked SLJ‘s reviewers to share some of their favorite recent books, along with a short “book hook”; these are mini-booktalks intended to grab the attention of kids and teens—in as few words as possible. Their responses are curated on a fun and shareable Pinterest board.

Please add your own favorite titles and book hooks in the comments section below or post on social media using the hashtag #sljbookhook.

Another brilliant idea from our colleagues at School Library Journal. This can easily be applied for adult summer reading as well. 

(via curliestofcrowns)

On Twitter, Green has 2 million followers. Compared to the rest of the leaders in Young Adult fiction, that number is staggering. To approach even half the Twitter influence of John Green all by himself, you need an entire army of YA women. Laurie Halse Anderson, Judy Blume, Sarah Dessen, Veronica Roth, Cassandra Clare, Richelle Mead, Margaret Stohl, Kami Garcia, Rainbow Rowell, Maureen Johnson, Malinda Lo, Holly Black, LJ Smith, Ellen Hopkins, Shannon Hale, Lauren Myracle, Libba Bray, Melissa Marr, and Leigh Bardugo: As a group these women only have about 1.2 million followers on Twitter. That’s the voice of one man outweighing several decades of women who have had major successes, critical acclaim, and cultural influence.

Add to that, I’m no longer watching television in which middle-aged men figure out how to be men. I’d rather watch shows about teenaged girls figuring out what it means to be a monster.

—from this interview with Kelly Link (via rollingsreliable)

(Source: zanopticon, via pollums)