mcnallykids:

EB White on the power and importance of libraries, 1971.

(via sarahreesbrennan)

“So raise a glass to teenage girls for their linguistic innovation. It expands our expressive vocabulary, giving us new words and modes of expression. Speakers may nostalgically look to a previous golden era of English, but the truth is that Shakespeare’s English is an abomination of Chaucer’s English, which is an abomination of Beowolf’s. Language is inherently unstable. It’s in a constant state of flux, made and remade—stretched, altered, broken down and rearranged—by its speakers every day. Rather than a sign of corruption and disorder, this is language in its full vitality—a living, evolving organism.”

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked Ally Carter’s Gallagher Girls series, you’ll like Kimberly Reid’s Langdon Prep novels, because both feature smart boarding school heroines who solve crimes.

onetrueharem:

ANYWAY I WANT TO TALK ABOUT DISABILITY IN THE LUNAR CHRONICLES

a lot of people have this really annoying idea that the way to get rid of ableism is to get rid of disability. if you believe this, let me introduce you to a little idea called shifting goalposts. disability is a social construct, so there will always be people with disabilities unless somehow society becomes, uh, post-disability.

so i really like how this becomes apparent with Cinder. Is Cinder disabled by real-life, modern-day standards? Absolutely. is Cinder disabled by the standards of the world in which she lives? yes, even if people don’t call it that. Cinder is outcast, mistrusted, and has her rights taken away because her body is not 100% biological. this is, to me, a very real possibility for what “future ableism” could look like. with what i was saying before about this “get rid of disability and ableism goes away” belief, many people seem to think that advanced prosthetic technology will make amputees practically nondisabled. in fact, while prosthetics can be tremendously helpful and improve quality of life, they do very little if anything to quell the fears of ableist people. so it is with Cinder and other cyborgs in her world.

i think one can also legitimately interpret being a lunar shell as having a disability. shells are mistrusted, imprisoned, and killed. “but but,” you might say, “shells have the ADDED BONUS ABILITY of being impervious to glamours!” yes, but! remember that the social construct of disability does not depend wholly on what abilities are and are not present. the argument that because someone has an extra power and therefore is not really disabled falls flat. shells, as the very label implies, are seen as lacking and less than.

aside from Cinder and Cress, we have Thorne, who is blind at this point in the story (i haven’t read far enough to know whether it’s permanent or temporary, but nevertheless a disability). Wolf’s altered neurology could also fall into this category, particularly as it was done without his consent, but now we’re getting a little more theoretical than i was planning to.

but anyhow, my conclusion? i’m really excited by how the Lunar Chronicles is giving the spotlight to characters with disabilities, both those we have in our world and some that do not (yet?) exist.

chamanka:

lapitiedangereuse: * Vladimir Nabokov, teaching his students how to read Kafka, pointed out to them that the insect into which Gregor Samsa is transformed is in fact a winged beetle, an insect that carries its wings under its armoured back, and that if Gregor had only discovered them, he would have been able to escape. And then Nabokov added: “Many a Dick and a Jane grow up like Gregor, unaware that they too have wings and can fly.”

chamanka:

lapitiedangereuse: * Vladimir Nabokov, teaching his students how to read Kafka, pointed out to them that the insect into which Gregor Samsa is transformed is in fact a winged beetle, an insect that carries its wings under its armoured back, and that if Gregor had only discovered them, he would have been able to escape. And then Nabokov added: “Many a Dick and a Jane grow up like Gregor, unaware that they too have wings and can fly.”

“I think a lot of people don’t understand that when we talk about these issues—blackface, rape jokes, the appropriation of marginalized cultures, and so on—we are having an ethical conversation, not a legal one. There is no thought police. No one’s coming to your house and carting you off to Insensitivity Prison. But you, as a person living on this planet, get to make a choice whether you want to hurt people or help people. Whether you want to listen or shut people out. I can’t imagine why you’d choose “defensive sh*thead” over “nice lady capable of empathy,” but okey dokey.”

weneeddiversebooks:

A few years ago, I was at the bookstore, and I saw a young girl perusing the pages of The Mighty Miss Malone (Random, 2012) by Christopher Paul Curtis. I was just about to tell her what a good book it was when her mother snatched the book out of her hands saying, “Oh honey, you don’t want that book!” I stood there shocked, willing myself to say something—but the moment was gone, just like so many others I’d witnessed before: a mother taking a “boy” book out of her daughter’s hand and handing her a “girl” book instead; a librarian who only displayed black books during Black History Month; a father refusing to buy a princess book for his son; a woman who steered her kids away from the Newbery Honor book When the Mountain Meets the Moon (Little, Brown, 2009) by Grace Lin, exclaiming, “We’re not Chinese!”; and the woman who told me she wouldn’t read my book Prophecy (HarperCollins, 2013), because Asian names were too confusing. There have been many such moments, and I have never called anyone out on it before. Until now.

“Changing the way we talk is not political correctness run amok. It reflects an admirable willingness to acknowledge others who once were barely visible to the dominant culture, and to recognize that something that may seem innocent to you may be painful to others.”