niwandajones:

Thanks to the folks who fought and died for the workplace rights we enjoy.

Thanks to the folks still fighting to bring those rights to all.

Happy Labor Day.

(Photos courtesy of the Kheel Archives: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kheelcenter/collections/)

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

How many times are we going to insult and alienate our colleagues like this?

How many more times will we sabotage our collective work?

theredshedevil:

black-american-queen:

ATTENTION HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS GRADUATING IN 2015.

Fill this out.

It is a scholarship THAT PAYS FOR ALL OF YOUR COLLEGE THROUGH GRADUATION.

I know a friend who had it, and its amazing. Four years of college — at any school of your choice in the United States. Harvard, University of Louisiana, UCLA — it COVERS IT.

Don’t go into debt for school, be part of this prestigious program.

Who is eligible?

African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian Pacific Islander American and Hispanic American students with high academic and leadership promise who have significant financial need;

Spread this Black Tumblr. This better have over 1,000 notes by morning because this will literally CHANGE SOMEONE’S LIFE.

This scholarship was promoted every year at my high school you have a 3.3 gpa volunteer work school activities and you gotta write like 10 essays this scholarship pays for every level of education you wanna pursue including PHD’s. Deffff worth the effort

“Look, without our stories, without the true nature and reality of who we are as People of Color, nothing about fanboy or fangirl culture would make sense. What I mean by that is: if it wasn’t for race, X-Men doesn’t sense. If it wasn’t for the history of breeding human beings in the New World through chattel slavery, Dune doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the history of colonialism and imperialism, Star Wars doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the extermination of so many Indigenous First Nations, most of what we call science fiction’s contact stories doesn’t make sense. Without us as the secret sauce, none of this works, and it is about time that we understood that we are the Force that holds the Star Wars universe together. We’re the Prime Directive that makes Star Trek possible, yeah. In the Green Lantern Corps, we are the oath. We are all of these things—erased, and yet without us—we are essential.”
— Junot Díaz, “The Junot Díaz Episode" (18 November 2013) on Fan Bros, a podcast “for geek culture via people of colors” (via kynodontas)

(via weneeddiversebooks)

mcnallykids:

EB White on the power and importance of libraries, 1971.

(via sarahreesbrennan)

“So raise a glass to teenage girls for their linguistic innovation. It expands our expressive vocabulary, giving us new words and modes of expression. Speakers may nostalgically look to a previous golden era of English, but the truth is that Shakespeare’s English is an abomination of Chaucer’s English, which is an abomination of Beowolf’s. Language is inherently unstable. It’s in a constant state of flux, made and remade—stretched, altered, broken down and rearranged—by its speakers every day. Rather than a sign of corruption and disorder, this is language in its full vitality—a living, evolving organism.”

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked Ally Carter’s Gallagher Girls series, you’ll like Kimberly Reid’s Langdon Prep novels, because both feature smart boarding school heroines who solve crimes.

onetrueharem:

ANYWAY I WANT TO TALK ABOUT DISABILITY IN THE LUNAR CHRONICLES

a lot of people have this really annoying idea that the way to get rid of ableism is to get rid of disability. if you believe this, let me introduce you to a little idea called shifting goalposts. disability is a social construct, so there will always be people with disabilities unless somehow society becomes, uh, post-disability.

so i really like how this becomes apparent with Cinder. Is Cinder disabled by real-life, modern-day standards? Absolutely. is Cinder disabled by the standards of the world in which she lives? yes, even if people don’t call it that. Cinder is outcast, mistrusted, and has her rights taken away because her body is not 100% biological. this is, to me, a very real possibility for what “future ableism” could look like. with what i was saying before about this “get rid of disability and ableism goes away” belief, many people seem to think that advanced prosthetic technology will make amputees practically nondisabled. in fact, while prosthetics can be tremendously helpful and improve quality of life, they do very little if anything to quell the fears of ableist people. so it is with Cinder and other cyborgs in her world.

i think one can also legitimately interpret being a lunar shell as having a disability. shells are mistrusted, imprisoned, and killed. “but but,” you might say, “shells have the ADDED BONUS ABILITY of being impervious to glamours!” yes, but! remember that the social construct of disability does not depend wholly on what abilities are and are not present. the argument that because someone has an extra power and therefore is not really disabled falls flat. shells, as the very label implies, are seen as lacking and less than.

aside from Cinder and Cress, we have Thorne, who is blind at this point in the story (i haven’t read far enough to know whether it’s permanent or temporary, but nevertheless a disability). Wolf’s altered neurology could also fall into this category, particularly as it was done without his consent, but now we’re getting a little more theoretical than i was planning to.

but anyhow, my conclusion? i’m really excited by how the Lunar Chronicles is giving the spotlight to characters with disabilities, both those we have in our world and some that do not (yet?) exist.

chamanka:

lapitiedangereuse: * Vladimir Nabokov, teaching his students how to read Kafka, pointed out to them that the insect into which Gregor Samsa is transformed is in fact a winged beetle, an insect that carries its wings under its armoured back, and that if Gregor had only discovered them, he would have been able to escape. And then Nabokov added: “Many a Dick and a Jane grow up like Gregor, unaware that they too have wings and can fly.”

chamanka:

lapitiedangereuse: * Vladimir Nabokov, teaching his students how to read Kafka, pointed out to them that the insect into which Gregor Samsa is transformed is in fact a winged beetle, an insect that carries its wings under its armoured back, and that if Gregor had only discovered them, he would have been able to escape. And then Nabokov added: “Many a Dick and a Jane grow up like Gregor, unaware that they too have wings and can fly.”